CoreML – iOS Implementation for the Boston Model (part 3) – Button

We are very close at getting a functioning app for our Boston Model. In the last post we were able to put together the code that fills in the values in the picker and were able to “pick” the values shown for crime rate and number of rooms respectively. These values are fed to the model we built in one of the earlier posts of this series and the idea is that we will action this via a button that triggers the calculation of the prediction. In turn the prediction will be shown in a floating dialogue box.

In this post we are going to activate the functionality of the button and show the user the values that have been picked. With this we will be ready to weave in the CoreML model in the final post of this series. So, what are we waiting for? Let us launch Xcode and get working. We have already done a bit of work for the button in the previous post where we connected the button to the ViewController generating a line of code that read as follows:

If we launch the application and click on the button, sadly, nothing will happen. Let’s change that: in the definition of the UIViewController class, after the didReceiveMemoryWarning function write the following piece of code:

The first four lines of the getPrediction function takes the values from the picker and creates some constants for crime and rooms that will then be used in a message to be displayed in the application. We are telling Xcode to treat this message as an alert and ask it to present it to the user (last line in the code above). What we need to do now is tell Xcode that this function is to be triggered when we click on the button.

There are several way we can connect the button with the code above. In this case we are going to go to the Main.storyboard, control+click on the button and drag. This will show an arrow, we need to connect that arrow with the View Controller icon (a yellow circle with a white square inside) at the top of the view controller window we are putting together. When you let go, you will see a drop-down menu. From there, under “Sent Events” select the function we created above, namely getPrediction. See the screenshots below:

You can now run the application. Select a number from each of the columns in the picker, and when ready, prepare to be amazed: Click on the “Calculate Prediction” button, et voilà – you will see a new window telling you the values you have just picked. Tap “OK” and start again!

In the next post we will add the CoreML model, and modify the event for the button to take the two values picked and calculate a prediction which in turn will be shown in the floating window. Stay tuned.

You can look at the code (in development) in my github site here.

Also published on Medium.

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