At the Norwegian Embassy for the Abel Committee Reception

 

At the Norwegian Embassy for the Abel Committee Reception.

The Abel Prize was established on 1 January 2002. Its purpose is to recognise outstanding scientific work in the field of mathematics. The prize amount is 6 million NOK (about 750,000 Euro) and was awarded for the first time on 3 June 2003.

Each year, in anticipation of the prize announcement, an afternnon of lectues showcases previous winners and member of the Committee. This year the event WAS be held in Oxford on Monday 15th January. Andrew Wiles, John Rognes and Irene Fonseca were the the speakers and a reception was held in the Norwegian Embassy in London. I had an opportunity to attend the reception as a member of the London Mathematical Society.

The 2018 Abel Prize recipient will be announced on March 20th by Ole M. Sejersted, President of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

The Abel Prize Laureates 2003-2016

2017: Yves Meyer
2016: Sir Andrew J. Wiles
2015: John F. Nash Jr. & Louis Nirenberg
2014:Yakov G. Sinai
2013: Pierre Deligne
2012: Endre Szemerédi
2011: John Milnor
2010: John Torrence Tate
2009: Mikhail Leonidovich Gromov
2008: John Griggs Thompson
and Jacques Tits
2007: Srinivasa S. R. Varadhan
2006: Lennart Carleson
2005: Peter D. Lax
2004: Sir Michael Francis Atiyah
and Isadore M. Singer
2003: Jean-Pierre Serre

Shell Game in the LMC

Shell Game in the LMC


An alluring sight in southern skies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is seen here through narrowband filters. The filters are designed to transmit only light emitted by ionized sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Ionized by energetic starlight, the atoms emit their characteristic light as electrons are recaptured and the atom transitions to a lower energy state. As a result, this false color image of the LMC seems covered with shell-shaped clouds of ionized gas surrounding massive, young stars. Sculpted by the strong stellar winds and ultraviolet radiation, the glowing clouds, dominated by emission from hydrogen, are known as H II (ionized hydrogen) regions. Itself composed of many overlapping shells, the Tarantula Nebula is the large star forming region at top center. A satellite of o ur Milky Way Galaxy, the LMC is about 15,000 light-years across and lies a mere 180,000 light-years away in the constellation Dorado.

Supermoon over Spanish Castle

Supermoon over Spanish Castle

No, this castle was not built with the Moon attached. To create the spectacular juxtaposition, careful planning and a bit of good weather was needed. Pictured, the last supermoon of 2016 was captured last week rising directly beyond one of the towers of Bellver Castle in Palma de Mallorca on the Balearic Islands of Spain. The supermoon was the last full moon of 2016 and known to some as the Oak MoonBellver Castle was built in the early 1300s and has served as a home — but occasional as a prison — to numerous kings and queens. The Moon was built about 4.5 billion years ago, possibly resulting from a great collision with a Mars-sized celestial body and Earth. The next supermoon, defined as when the moonappears slightly larger and brighter than usual, will occur on 2017 December 3 and be visible not only behind castles but all over the Earth.

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