Science Communication – Technical Writing and Presentation Advice

The two videos below were made a few years ago to support a Science Communication and Group Project module at the School of Physics Astronomy and Mathematics at the University of Hertfordshire. The work was supported by the Institute of Physics and the HE STEM programme. I also got support from the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. The tools are probably a bit dated now, but I hope the principles still help some students trying to get their work seen.

The students were encouraged to share and communicate the results of their projects via a video and they were supported by tutorials on how to do screencasts.

Students were also encouraged to prepare technical documentation and the videos for using LaTeX and structuring their documents with LaTeXwere very useful.

Technical Writing

This presentation addresses some issues we should take into account when writing for technical purposes.

Presentation Advice

In this tutorial we will address some of points that can help you make a better presentation either for a live talk or for recording.

Screencasting with Macs and PCs

The videos below were made a few years ago to support a Science Communication and Group Project module at the School of Physics Astronomy and Mathematics at the University of Hertfordshire. The work was supported by the Institute of Physics and the HE STEM programme. I also got support from the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. The tools are probably a bit dated now, but I hope the principles still help some students trying to get their work seen.

Students were asked to prepare a short video to present the results of their project and share it with the world. To support them, the videos below were prepared.

Students were also encouraged to prepare technical documentation and the videos for using LaTeX and structuring their documents with LaTeX were very useful.

Screencasting with a Mac

In this video we will see some tools to capture video from your screen using a Mac. The tools are Quicktime Player, MPEG Streamclip and iMovie.

Screencasting with a PC

In this video we will see some tools to capture video from your screen using a PC. The tools are CamStudio and Freemake Video Converter.

Uploading a Video to Vimeo

In this tutorial we will see how to set up an account in Vimeo and how to upload your screencast. Also you will be able to send a link to your video to you friends and other people.

Structured Documents in LaTeX

This is a video I made a few years ago to encourage my students to use better tools to write dissertations, thesis and reports that include the use of mathematics. The principles stand, although the tools may have moved on since then. I am reposting them as requested by a colleague of mine, Dr Catarina Carvalho, who I hope will still find this useful.

In this video we continue explaining how to use LaTeX. Here we will see how to use a master document in order to build a thesis or dissertation.
We assume that you have already had a look at the tutorial entitled: LaTeX for writing mathematics – An introduction

Structured Documents in LaTeX

LaTeX for writing mathematics – An introduction

This is a video I made a few years ago to encourage my students to use better tools to write dissertations, thesis and reports that include the use of mathematics. The principles stand, although the tools may have moved on since then. I am reposting them as requested by a colleague of mine, Dr Catarina Carvalho, who I hope will still find this useful.

In this video we explore the LaTeX document preparation system. We start with a explaining an example document. We have made use of TeXmaker as an editor given its flexibility and the fact that it is available for different platforms.

LaTeX for writing mathematics – An introduction

Artificial Intelligence, Revealed

A few weeks ago I was invited by General Assembly to give a short intro to Data Science to a group of interested (and interesting) students. They all had different backgrounds, but they all shared an interest for technology and related subjects.

While I was explaining some of the differences between supervised and unsupervised machine learning, I used my example of an alien life trying to cluster (and eventually classify) cats and dogs. If you are interested to know more about this, you will probably have to wait for the publication of my “Data Science and Analytics with Python” book.. I digress…

So, Ed Shipley – one of the admissions managers at GA London – asked me and the students if we had seen the videos that Facebook had produced to explain machine learning… He was reminded of them as they use an example about a machine distinguishing between dogs and cars… (see what they did there?…). If you haven’t seen the videos, here you go:

Intro to AI

Machine Learning

Convolutional Neural Nets

Extract tables from messy spreadsheets with jailbreakr (reblog)

The original blog can be seen here.

R has some good tools for importing data from spreadsheets, among them the readxl package for Excel and the googlesheets package for Google Sheets. But these only work well when the data in the spreadsheet are arranged as a rectangular table, and not overly encumbered with formatting or generated with formulas. As Jenny Bryan pointed out in her recent talk at the useR!2016 conference (and embedded below, or download PDF slides here), in practice few spreadsheets have “a clean little rectangle of data in the upper-left corner”, because most people use spreadsheets not just a file format for data retrieval, but also as a reporting/visualization/analysis tool.

Nonetheless, for a practicing data scientist, there’s a lot of useful data locked up in these messy spreadsheets that needs to be imported into R before we can begin analysis. As just one example given by Jenny in her talk, this spreadsheet was included as one of 15,000 spreadsheet attachments (one with 175 tabs!) in the Enron Corpus.

Enron

To make it easier to import data into R from messy spreadsheets like this, Jenny and co-author Richard G. FitzJohn created the jailbreakr package. The package is in its early stages, but it can already import Excel (xlsx format) and Google Sheets intro R as a new “linen” objects from which small sub-tables can easily be extracted as data frames. It can also print spreadsheets in a condensed text-based format with one character per cell — useful if you’re trying to figure out why an apparently simple spreadsheet isn’t importing as you expect. (Check out the “weekend getaway winner” story near the end of Jenny’s talk for a great example.)

The jailbreakr package isn’t yet on CRAN, but if you want to try it out you can download it from the Github repository (or even contribute!) at the link below.

Github (rsheets): jailbreakr