Structured Documents in LaTeX

This is a video I made a few years ago to encourage my students to use better tools to write dissertations, thesis and reports that include the use of mathematics. The principles stand, although the tools may have moved on since then. I am reposting them as requested by a colleague of mine, Dr Catarina Carvalho, who I hope will still find this useful.

In this video we continue explaining how to use LaTeX. Here we will see how to use a master document in order to build a thesis or dissertation.
We assume that you have already had a look at the tutorial entitled: LaTeX for writing mathematics – An introduction

Structured Documents in LaTeX

LaTeX for writing mathematics – An introduction

This is a video I made a few years ago to encourage my students to use better tools to write dissertations, thesis and reports that include the use of mathematics. The principles stand, although the tools may have moved on since then. I am reposting them as requested by a colleague of mine, Dr Catarina Carvalho, who I hope will still find this useful.

In this video we explore the LaTeX document preparation system. We start with a explaining an example document. We have made use of TeXmaker as an editor given its flexibility and the fact that it is available for different platforms.

LaTeX for writing mathematics – An introduction

Furigana (ふりがな) in LaTeX

Furigana example
Furigana example (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some time ago I wrote a post about adding furigana using MS Word for Mac. It seems that the post has been quite useful to a few readers, nonetheless some of you have contacted me about the remark I made about doing this with in LaTeX.

So far I have helped people when they have requested help, but as I promised in that post, I have finally come to adding a post to add furigana using LaTex. Here is how:

You will need the following packages installed in your LaTeX distribution:

With these packages installed and working in your distribution, you can now use a document similar to the following:

documentclass[12pt]{article}

usepackage[10pt]{type1ec} % use only 10pt fonts
usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
usepackage{CJKutf8}
usepackage[german, russian, vietnam, USenglish]{babel}
usepackage[overlap, CJK]{ruby}
usepackage{CJKulem}
renewcommand{rubysep}{-0.2ex}
newenvironment{Japanese}{%
CJKfamily{min}%
CJKtilde
CJKnospace}{}
begin{document}
begin{CJK}{UTF8}{}
begin{Japanese}
noindent これは日本語の文章
noindent Hello 
begin{equation}
 frac{2}{pi}
end{equation}
私は日本語の勉強します!
furigana: ruby{私}{わたし}
end{Japanese}
end{CJK}
end{document}

The outcome of the script above can be seen below:

Furigana Latex

iBooks Author supports LaTeX now

When Apple launched iBooks Author back in January 2012 I was quite curious to see the things that you were able to do with it. It all looked very nice and relatively easy to use. You can create documents using some templates provided and you then are able to export them as PDF or even publish them as iBooks.

Unfortunately, at the time, Apple failed to put any easy support to include equations or mathematical symbols. That alone put me off using the application altogether (see post). However, in the recent update (released on October 23rd) Apple has finally included an equation editor that uses LaTeX or  MathML. I have just tried it and it seems to do a good work. Definitely not as powerful as the actual LaTeX engine (it does not let you number the equations automatically for instance), but it is an improvement.

Here are some screenshots of the little first trial I did. As you can see the update clearly states that the new editor accepts native LaTeX or MathML:

 

ibooks_latex1

Now, to insert a new equation:

ibooks_latex2

 

This opens up the equation editor:

ibooks_latex3

 

In the new window you can start typing your LaTeX commands. Notice that you don’t need to start an equation environment as you would do in LaTeX, you simply type the commands that will create the maths:

 

ibooks_latex4

Once you have done that, simply tell iBooks Author to insert the equation, and voilà:

ibooks_latex5

 

Have you used iBooks Author? What do you think of it? What is your opinion about the support for LaTeX?

I think I may give it a go, but will probably continue using LaTeX itself. If you want to learn learn about using it have a look at these past posts:

Structured Documents in LaTeX

The LaTeX logo, typeset with LaTeX

Continuing with the brief introduction to LaTeX that I posted recently, in this video I discuss the use of LaTeX to produce a document that has a structure similar to that of a book for example. The idea is to build a master file that controls the flow of the document and separates each “Chapter” in separate files. This provides the author with a lot of flexibility in terms of organising content and makes large documents far more manageable than when using a single LaTeX file.

Enjoy and any feedback, comments or suggestions are more than welcome.

Using LaTeX to write mathematics

I have been meaning to do something like this for a long time and finally got the courage to do it. A lot of times I get completely horrified by the way in which some documents that contain mathematical notations are mangled (quite literally) by using MS Word. It helps sometimes that some people have access to MathType but still…

LaTeXSo, in this video I intend to provide some help to those that are interested in using LaTeX to include mathematics and  produce their documents. LaTeX is freely available for various platforms. You can obtain MikTeX for  Windows here, and MacTeX for Mac here. There are a great variety of editors to choose from; in this video I recommend TeXmaker, which I believe provides quite a lot of help to those of us that still are attached to the pointing and clicking of MS Word.

Let me know what you think! Any feedback is always welcome.