Now Reading: Dark Data

Now Reading: Dark Data by David Hand

I first came across a mention of this book in the Summer 2020 number of Imperial, the magazine for the Imperial College Community in a feature note about the book.

It sounded like an interesting read and I had a look for the Princeton University Press book and to my surprise I found an version in Italian published by Rizzoli a few months earlier… I wonder how that worked out. It was cheaper and I was tempted to give it a go in Italian with the name Il tradimento dei numeri (i.e. “The betrayal of the numbers”…). I wonder what hidden story is behind all this…

In the end I decided to go for the English version… Let’s see how it goes.

David Hand is emeritus professor of mathematics at Imperial College London, a former president of the Royal Statistical Society, and a Fellow of the British Academy.

There is a website dedicated to the book: https://darkdata.website

Data Skeptic Podcast

I had an opportunity to be one of the panellists in the Data Skeptic podcast recently. It was great to have been invited and as a listener to the podcast it was a really treat to be able to take part. Also, recording it was fun…

You can listen to the episode here.

More information about the Data Skeptic Journal Club can be found in their site. I would like to thank  Kyle Polich, Lan Guo and George Kemp for having me as a guest. I hope it is not the last time!

In the episode Kyle talks about the relationship between Covid-19 and Carbon Emissions. George tells us about the new Hateful Memes Challenge from Facebook. Lan joins us to talk about Google’s AI Explorables. I talk about a paper that uses neural networks to detect infections in the ear.

Let me know what you guys think!

Getting Answers for Core ML deployment from my own Book

I was working today in the deployment of a small neural network model prototype converted to Core ML to be used in an iPhone app.

I was trying to find the best way to get things to work and then it occurred to me I had solved a similar issue before… where‽ when‽ aha!

The answer was actually in my Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python.

Natural Language Processing Talk – Newspaper Article

With the lockdown and social distancing rules forcing all of us to adjust our calendars, events and even lesson plans and lectures, I was not surprised to hear of speaking opportunities that otherwise may not arise.

A great example is the reprise of a talk I gave about a year ago while visiting Mexico. It was a great opportunity to talk to Social Science students at the Political Science Faculty of the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. The subject was open but had to cover the use of technology and I thought that talking about the use of natural language processing in terms of digital humanities would be a winner. And it was…

In March this year I was approached by the Faculty to re-run the talk but this time instead of doing it face to face we would use a teleconference room. Not only was I, the speaker, talking from the comfort of my own living room, but also all the attendees would be at home. Furthermore, some of the students may not have access to the live presentation (lack of broadband, equipment, etc) and recoding the session for later usage was the best option for them.

I didn’t hesitate in saying yes, and I enjoyed the interaction a lot. Today I learnt that the session was the focus of a small note in a local newspaper. The session was run in Spanish and the note in Portal, the local newspaper, is in Spanish too. I really liked that they picked a line I used in the session to convince the students that technology is not just for the natural sciences:

“Hay que hacer ciencias sociales con técnicas del Siglo XIX… El mundo es de los geeks.

“We should study social sciences applying techniques of the 21st Century. The world today belongs to us, the geeks.

The point is that although qualitative and quantitative techniques are widely used in social science, the use of new platforms and even programming languages such as python open up opportunities for social scientists too.

The talk is available in the blog the class uses to share their discussions: The Share Knowledge Network – Follow this link for the talk.

The newspaper article by Ximena Barragán can be found here.

Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python is published

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It is official! “Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python” is published!

According to the information I had received from CRC Press, my publisher, the book would be available on May 7th. According to the official page of the book the volume was available since May 5th.

So if you have already preorder, your copies may be on their way soon. If not, you can definitely get your copy either with CRC Press, or Amazon.

Looking forward to hearing what you think of the book.

Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python – Discount

I am reaching out as volume 2 of my data science book will be out for publication in May and my publisher has made it possible for me to offer 20% off. You can order the book here.

This follows from “Data Science and Analytics with Python” and both books are intended for practitioners in data science and data analytics in both academic and business environments.

The new book aims to present the reader with concepts in data science and analytics that were deemed to be more advanced or simply out of scope in the author’s first book, and are used in data analytics using tools developed in Python such as SciKit Learn, Pandas, Numpy, etc. The use of Python is of particular benefit given its recent popularity in the data science community. The book is therefore a reference to be used by seasoned programmers and newcomers alike and the key benefit is the practical approach presented throughout the book

More information about the first book can be found here.

Jackalope Data Science – Community Call

With all the changes that have taken place in the las couple of weeks, I was thinking of the support that we can provide to each other while keeping to the new ways of working around us. Working from home is nothing new for some, but not for many. Socialising is an important part of the human experience.

I therefore thought of putting an open invite for a virtual coffee to the data science/physics/maths community dealing with the new ways of working, business, mental health and general stuff:

The response was great and I promptly created a new page in this site dedicated to some information for the new Jackalope Data Science Community. The first call took place on March 26th, 6.30pm via Meet. There were about 12 attendees mainly from the UK, with some from Cyprus, the US and other places around the world.

It was great to see so many friends there and the chat ranged from how to distinguish between weekdays and weekends these days, to how we are coping with working from home and how companies and businesses are reacting. It was entertaining, and personally I found it very useful.

We are planning to get together again in a couple of weeks. If you are interested to join us and learn more the Jackalope Data Science Community, get in touch.

Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python – Proofreading

Super excited to have received the proofread version of Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python. They all seem to be very straightforward corrections: a few missing commas, some italics here and there and capitalisation bits and bobs.

I hope to be able to finish the corrections before my deadline for March 25th, and then enter the last phase before publication in May 2020.

Cover Draft for “Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python”

I have received the latest information about the status of my book “Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python”. This time reviewing the latest cover drafts for the book.

This is currently my favourite one.

Awaiting the proofreading comments, and I hope to update you about that soon.