Getting Answers for Core ML deployment from my own Book

I was working today in the deployment of a small neural network model prototype converted to Core ML to be used in an iPhone app.

I was trying to find the best way to get things to work and then it occurred to me I had solved a similar issue before… where‽ when‽ aha!

The answer was actually in my Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python.

Natural Language Processing Talk – Newspaper Article

With the lockdown and social distancing rules forcing all of us to adjust our calendars, events and even lesson plans and lectures, I was not surprised to hear of speaking opportunities that otherwise may not arise.

A great example is the reprise of a talk I gave about a year ago while visiting Mexico. It was a great opportunity to talk to Social Science students at the Political Science Faculty of the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México. The subject was open but had to cover the use of technology and I thought that talking about the use of natural language processing in terms of digital humanities would be a winner. And it was…

In March this year I was approached by the Faculty to re-run the talk but this time instead of doing it face to face we would use a teleconference room. Not only was I, the speaker, talking from the comfort of my own living room, but also all the attendees would be at home. Furthermore, some of the students may not have access to the live presentation (lack of broadband, equipment, etc) and recoding the session for later usage was the best option for them.

I didn’t hesitate in saying yes, and I enjoyed the interaction a lot. Today I learnt that the session was the focus of a small note in a local newspaper. The session was run in Spanish and the note in Portal, the local newspaper, is in Spanish too. I really liked that they picked a line I used in the session to convince the students that technology is not just for the natural sciences:

“Hay que hacer ciencias sociales con técnicas del Siglo XIX… El mundo es de los geeks.

“We should study social sciences applying techniques of the 21st Century. The world today belongs to us, the geeks.

The point is that although qualitative and quantitative techniques are widely used in social science, the use of new platforms and even programming languages such as python open up opportunities for social scientists too.

The talk is available in the blog the class uses to share their discussions: The Share Knowledge Network – Follow this link for the talk.

The newspaper article by Ximena Barragán can be found here.

Computer Programming Knowledge

I came across the image above in the Slack channel of the University of Hertfordshire Centre for Astrophysics Research. It summarises some of the fundamental knowledge in computer science that was assumed necessary at some point in time: Binar, CPU execution and algorithms.

They refer to 7 algorithms, but actually rather than actual algorithms they are classes:

  1. Sort
  2. Search
  3. Hashing
  4. Dynamic Programming
  5. Binary Exponentiation
  6. String Matching and Parsing
  7. Primality Testing

I like the periodic table shown at the bottom of the graphic. Showing some old friends such as Fortran, C, Basic and Cobol. Some other that are probably not used all that much, and others that have definitely been rising: Javascript, Java, C++, Lisp. It is great to se Python, number 35, listed as Multi-Paradigm!

Enjoy!

Cover Draft for “Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python”

I have received the latest information about the status of my book “Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python”. This time reviewing the latest cover drafts for the book.

This is currently my favourite one.

Awaiting the proofreading comments, and I hope to update you about that soon.

LibreOffice – Dialogue boxes showing blanks

I have been using LibreOffice on and off for a few years now and generally I think it is a great alternative to the MS Office offering. It does the tasks that are required and the improvements over different versions have been steady and useful

I had however a very strange experience in which dialogue boxes and other windows such as alerts and messages just showed blank text. It was obvious that there was some important information in them, but it was not possible to read them. In some cases it was ok… I mean I knew here the “OK” button was expected to appear, or where “Cancel” should be placed. However, it was an annoying (at best) and limiting (at worst) exoperience.

After digging in a bit I realised what the problem was. The fonts that were supposed to be showing were at fault. The culprits were as follows:

  • DINRegular.ttf, and
  • DINRegularAlternate.ttf

After removing these two fonts from ~/Library/Fonts/ everything went back to normal. I hope this helps in case you are having a similar issue.

Pandas 1.0 is out

If you are interested in #DataScience you surely have heard of #pandas and you would be pleased to hear that version 1.0 finally out. With better integration with bumpy and improvements with numba among others. Take a look!
— Read on www.anaconda.com/pandas-1-0-is-here/

MacOS – No Floating Thumbnail when taking a screenshot

Have you tried taking a screenshot in your Mac and are annoyed at having to wait for the floating thumbnail – in other words you wait for 5 seconds before the screenshot becomes a file? Well here you can find out how to get rid of that.

Follow these steps:

1) Type CMD + SHIFT + 5
2) Click OPTIONS
3) Uncheck “Show Floating Thumbnail”
4) Et voilà!

See the screenshot above!

Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python – Submitted!

There you go, the first checkpoint is completed: I have officially submitted the completed version of “Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python”.

The book has been some time in the making (and in the thinking…). It is a follow up from my previous book, imaginatively called “Data Science and Analytics with Python” . The book covers aspects that were necessarily left out in the previous volume; however, the readers in mind are still technical people interested in moving into the data science and analytics world. I have tried to keep the same tone as in the first book, peppering the pages with some bits and bobs of popular culture, science fiction and indeed Monty Python puns. 

Advanced Data Science and Analytics with Python enables data scientists to continue developing their skills and apply them in business as well as academic settings. The subjects discussed in this book are complementary and a follow up from the topics discuss in Data Science and Analytics with Python. The aim is to cover important advanced areas in data science using tools developed in Python such as SciKit-learn, Pandas, Numpy, Beautiful Soup, NLTK, NetworkX and others. The development is also supported by the use of frameworks such as Keras, TensorFlow and Core ML, as well as Swift for the development of iOS and MacOS applications.

The book can be read independently form the previous volume and each of the chapters in this volume is sufficiently independent from the others proving flexibiity for the reader. Each of the topics adressed in the book tackles the data science workflow from a practical perspective, concentrating on the process and results obtained. The implementation and deployment of trained models are central to the book

Time series analysis, natural language processing, topic modelling, social network analysis, neural networds and deep learning are comprehensively covrered in the book. The book discusses the need to develop data products and tackles the subject of bringing models to their intended audiences. In this case literally to the users fingertips in the form of an iPhone app.

While the book is still in the oven, you may want to take a look at the first volume. You can get your copy here:

Furthermore you can see my Author profile here.

Natural Language Processing – Talk

Last October I had the great opportunity to come and give a talk at the Facultad de Ciencias Políticas, UAEM, México. The main audience were students of the qualitative analysis methods course, but there were people also from informatics and systems engineering.

It was an opportunity to showcase some of the advances that natural language processing offers to social scientists interested in analysing discourse, from politics through to social interactions.

The talk covered a introduction and brief history of the field. We went through the different stages of the analysis, from reading the data, obtaining tokens and labelling their part of speech (POS) and then looking at syntactic and semantic analysis.

We finished the session with a couple of demos. One looking at speeches of Clinton and Trump during their presidential campaigns; the other one was a simple analysis of a novel in Spanish.

Thanks for the invite.

Apple Developer Support

It is great to see all the support that Apple Developers get in terms of tools, ecosystem, community and more.

Apple_support

For starters the Developer Support portal has a ton of information for the new comer as well as for the more expert of experts. Including guides and documentation for tools such as Xcode as well as information for developing software for MacOS and iOS.

Information about Design is available in the same place, including Human Interface Guidelines, Fonts (including downloads for San Francisco!) and information about accessibility and localisation.

Information about new tools and updates such as the latest about Swift, and SwiftUI can be easily found. And testing your apps with the help of tools such as TestFlight makes things so much easier.